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Let’s face it. Many teenagers nowadays can’t live without using social media. According to a poll by Common Sense Media, more than half of teenagers visit their favourite social media site more than once a day, and nearly a quarter log on more than 10 times a day and seventy-five percent of teens have cell phones, which they use mainly for texting and to access social media.



Unlike before, parents these days are worried about the social, emotional and health effects of cyberbullying addictions of their teens, that’s why, even the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is calling on pediatricians wearing uniforms scrubs to incorporate questions about social media usage into doctor visits. In a clinical report released Monday, the Academy had even offered guidance to people in uniforms scrubs and as well as to parents on how to peek into the online lives of kids without seeming to pry. They further said that “with this generation of kids, they kind of emerged online before parents taught them the dangers of being online; parents would never put a kid behind the wheel without driver's education. If parents take that approach with younger kids who are growing up, those kids will be much better off.”


Thus, the formation of strategy aimed to parents and to men and women in uniforms scrubs as well. Doctors were also given the duty to encourage parents to improve their tech and cyber skills too.


Looking unto the call of AAP to doctors makes me wonder if it is still part of the obligation of the doctor to do these things. Do you think that this is the primary duty of parents (not of doctors)? And as a parent, it is a shame that even your doctor will be the one who will remind you and urge you to watch out for your kids social media addiction, instead of you watching out for your child’s care and welfare, eh.

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